Scientific, Technical, and Conservation Advisory Board

Scientific, Technical, and Conservation Advisory Board

Tui De Roy
Dave Foreman
Dr. Birute Galdikas
Randall H. Hayes
Dr. Herbert Henrich
Dr. Sidney Holt
Captain Jet Johnson
Dr. Louise Leakey
Dr. Joe MacInnis
Dr. Godfrey Merlen
Grant Pereira

Tui De Roy

Tui-De-Roy

Tui De Roy is an award-winning wildlife photographer, naturalist, and author of many books on wildlife themes around the world. She is also an ardent conservationist who has combined her life’s three passions — Wildness, Photography and Conservation — into a successful career as a world communicator striving to sensitize her audiences to take better care of our natural planet. With this conviction at heart, she is a Founding Fellow of the International League of Conservation Photographers (ILCP), http://www.ilcp.com.

Tui is Belgian by birth, but grew up in the Galapagos Islands, where her parents took her to lead a pioneering lifestyle when she was two years old. She never attended school, being home taught, and is fluent in four languages: English, French, Spanish and German. After more than 35 years in the Galapagos Islands, Tui relocated to the South Island of New Zealand 20 years ago. She runs The Roving Tortoise Nature Photography together with business partner Mark Jones, working freelance under the logo ‘Images of Wildlife and Wilderness from Our Planet’s Most Pristine, Uninhabited Regions’.

Published in more than 40 countries, Tui’s first articles appeared in major U.S. nature magazines when she was 19, followed a few years later by her first book, GALAPAGOS: ISLANDS LOST IN TIME (Viking 1980). Many subsequent volumes cover not only the Galapagos Islands, but other natural wonders of the world, notably Antarctica, the Andes Mountains, and New Zealand. Her most recent books include ALBATROSS: THEIR WORLD, THEIR WAYS, an in-depth celebration of the world’s most endangered multi-species bird family, and GALAPAGOS: PRESERVING DARWIN’S LEGACY, which represents a compilation of 50 years of science and conservation work since these islands were declared Ecuador’s first national park. This latter effort won Tui an ‘Honorary Park Warden’ medal from the Galapagos National Park when it decided to publish a Spanish translation of the book as a closure of its 2009 half-century anniversary events.

New Books in progress include PENGUINS: THEIR WORLD, THEIR WAYS, sister volume and sequel to ALBATROSS, whose purpose is to draw attention to the increasingly beleaguered status of these charismatic aquatic birds, and another book on a wildlife-rich region of Kenya, a little-known area of tremendous conservation value. For more on Tui’s life and work, visit http://www.tuideroy.com.

As I grow older my hopes that we can still save the wild integrity of this planet are dwindling, yet Sea Shepherd revives that vision through the uncompromising defense of the inherent rights of pristine nature to exist, and the philosophy that all life on earth must remain our brethren. I particularly admire Capt. Paul Watson’s unwavering energy in placing action where words aren’t enough, harming no life, but defending so much of it. Untold numbers of living organisms, which are our kin in this complex web called the biosphere have benefited, and are benefiting, from that action.

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Dave Foreman

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Dave Foreman is a radical American environmentalist.  He is one of the founders of Earth First!, a group noted for consisting of ecological saboteurs, or ecoteurs.  To defend the environment, members of this group practice various destructive acts against both humans and machinery.

Foreman was born in 1947, the son of a United States Air Force employee.  As a young man, he was the chair of Young Americans for Freedom, a conservative organization; in the 1970s, he worked for the Wilderness Society.

Eventually, Foreman developed the idea that, while they are often well-meaning, government agencies, as well moderate private organizations, could not and would not stand up to the powerful forces attempting to destroying America’s environment.

Inspired by Edward Abbey’s book, The Monkey Wrench Gang, Foreman set about to from a group of radical environmentalists to engage in “monkey-wrenching,” including such acts as “spiking” trees so that they could not be cut down, “munching” logging roads by the use of  nails, toppling high-voltage power lines, as well as other subversive practices that resulted in protecting the environment.

Thus Earth First! was born — along with its motto: “No compromise in defense of Mother Earth.”  This very unconventional organization operates without rules or officers.  As Foreman intended, it is simply a group of people who are passionate about the environment; along with ecotage, members use self-deprecating humor to mantain sanity and oppose fanaticism.

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Dr. Birute Galdikas

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Biruté Galdikas was born in London, Germany, on May 10, 1946, while her parents were en route from Lithuania to Canada. She grew up in Toronto, Canada.

When Biruté was 12 years old she loved to go into the wilder sections of High Park in  Toronto. She would spend hours like this, quietly and secretly observing the wild animals in the park.

When she went to university, she combined her love of nature with her curiosity about the great apes and studied psychology and anthropology.

At 22, while she was working on her masters degree in anthropology at the University of California in Los Angeles, Biruté met Dr. Louis Leakey, who is famous for discovering fossils of early humans in Africa. Leakey and the National Geographic Society helped her to set up a research camp in Borneo to study orangutans.

Biruté arrived in Borneo with her husband, Rod Brindamour, in 1971. They had to live in primitive conditions. Within a few years, she gave birth to a son, Binty, who was raised among the orangutans and dubbed “the child of the rain forest”. Biruté had to make difficult choices in the years that followed. She made the agonizing decision to remain in the rain forest when her marriage ended. Her son Binti returned to Canada with her ex-husband. Later she remarried and had two more children.

From March 1996 through the end of March 1998 under a special decree, Biruté served as a senior advisor to the Minister of Forestry on orangutan issues. In June 1997 she won the prestigious “Kalpataru” award, the highest award given by the Republic of Indonesia for outstanding environmental leadership and activity. Biruté Galdikas was the first person of non-Indonesian birth and one of the first women to be so recognized by the Indonesian government.

Biruté is uncompromising in her defense of wild orangutans and the preservation of tropical rain forests, which constitute the orangutan species’ only natural habitat. She has always had grassroots support and the continued support of the Indonesian government, even in transition, in her pioneering research and effort to conserve and protect orangutans and rain forests as well as the support from numerous conservation groups around the world. Many of these organizations have honored Biruté with environmental awards.

Founder: Orangutan Foundation International

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Randall H. Hayes

Randy Hayes is Executive Director at Foundation Earth, a non-profit organization rethinking a human order that works within the planet’s life support systems. As a former filmmaker and Rainforest Action Network founder, he is a veteran of many high-visibility corporate accountability campaigns and has advocated for the rights of Indigenous peoples. He served over seven years as President of The City of San Francisco Commission on the Environment and as Director of Sustainability in the office of Oakland Mayor Jerry Brown (four-term governor). As a wilderness lover, Hayes has explored the High Sierras, the Canadian Rockies and the rainforests of the Amazon, Central America, Congo, Southeast Asia, Borneo, and Australia. He is a special advisor to the World Future Council. He has been described in the Wall Street Journal as “an environmental pit bull.” He also spent four years working at the International Forum on Globalization, a San Francisco-based think tank tasked with analyzing the cultural, social, political and environmental impacts of economic globalization. Randy sits on several non-profit Boards of Directors and numerous Boards of Advisors. He guest lectures in Green MBA programs promoting a steady state, circular True Cost Economy.

In 2018 he was awarded a Doctorate in Humane Letters from San Francisco State University where he also received a Master’s degree in Environmental Planning. He was inducted in the university’s Alumni Hall of Fame in 2010. His master’s thesis, the award-winning film The Four Corners, won the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences award for “Best Student Documentary” in 1983. He contributed to Alternatives to Economic Globalization: A Better World is Possible, published by San Francisco: Berrett-Koehler Publishers, Inc., in 2004. Not satisfied with short-term thinking, his 500-year seven point plan offers a vision of a sustainable society and how to get there. His corporate campaign activist peers honored Randy Hayes in 2008 with an Individual Achievement Award, given by the Business Ethics Network. His current focus is a strategy to halt the 6th Great Extinction – Nature Needs Half and how do we rebuild post-collapse should industrial humanity continue its serious assault on the planet’s life support systems.

Randy Hayes is a hero and a visionary — a radical messenger with the mentality of a Madison Avenue ad executive who is selling just one thing, saving the world before it is too late.

– Adam Werbach, Former President of the Sierra Club

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Dr. Herbert Henrich

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Dr. Herbert A.E. Henrich is a German economist engaged in the field of agro-inustrial development of eastern Africa, and much involved in animal welfare issues there.

He is acting as Sea Shepherd’s representative in the effort to establish the first seal rescue and care center in South Africa.

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Dr. Sidney Holt

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Dr Sidney Holt is a British fisheries scientist who became involved with whales and whaling when he was invited by the International Whaling Commission in 1960, with two other independent scientists, to advise on what would be the sustainable catches of blue, fin, humpback and sei whales in the Southern Ocean that would also permit those extremely depleted populations to recover towards their former abundance. The other members of the Committee of Three, or 3 Wide men, as it was called, were Prof. Douglas Chapman, a mathematician at the University of Washington and Dr K Radway Allen. who was then working for the Government of Australia. Chapman and Allen both later served as Chairmen of the IWC’s Scientific Committee; Holt continued to work for, and represent. FAO of the UN, UNESCI/IOC, UNEP and the UN until his retirement in 1979. The IWC had committed itself to an unprecedented act – to adopt the Committee of Three’s advice by 1964. The advice was for such huge reductions in catches that it got fully implemented only a few years later, but by the end of the 1960s the pelafic factory-ship whaling in the Southern Ocean dor all the baleen whale species except the small minke whale had ceased. (Exploitation of the minke by Japan and the USSR did not begin until 1970.)

Sidney was, with Dr Lyell Watson, the principle architect and motor of the successful operation by the Government of the Republic of Seychelles that year to persuade the IWC to declare the Indian Ocean as a whale sanctuary in perpetuity. That was quickly followed by other Seychelles initiatives, declaring a moratorium on the hunting of sperm whles and then, in 1982 a general indefinite moratorium on all commercial whaling, coming into effect in 1986. Sidney’s last scientific/political involvement was working with the Government of France (and with some others, especially Italy and Chile, and much help from Greenpeace, IFAW and WWF) to achieve the declaration of the entire Southern Ocean as a sanctuary for whales, in 1994.

Throughout his ‘retirement’ Sidney continued, until 2011 to attend and be active in IWC affairs. He is now re-engaged in fisheries research and management, while serving as one of SSCS’s advisers.

Why I support SSCS on the whaling issue.

Although I have long had, and continue to have, informal and sometime formal advisory relations with several NGOs that consistently and persistently oppose commercial whaling, I am looking to SSCS for two special reasons:
1. SSCS is not afraid to speak out against cruelty to, and mistreatment of, sentient non-human beings, and
2. SSCS more than any others is clear about the fact that commercial whaling, especially that by Japan in the guise of scientific research, is driven solely by business/financial considerations and is best opposed through disrupting those imperatives, both on the supply and the demand sides.

I am also impressed by the clarity and unambiguity with which Paul Watson expresses his views and defines the SSCS strategy. And I applaud the dedication and bravery of those who crew the SSCS ships. Lastly, I tend always to support those who try to persuade or even force Governments and other “Authorities” to honour the commitments they have made by being party to international agreements. rather than merely by paying lip-service to them.

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Captain Jet Johnson

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Al “Jet” Johnson was the founder of Greenpeace USA in 1975. Al joined Captain Paul Watson’s Greenpeace seal campaign in 1975 and was Paul’s deputy leader for the Greenpeace seal expeditions of 1976 and 1977.

Jet was one of Greenpeace’s most colourful activists. Trained as a fighter pilot for the Royal Canadian Airforce, he later worked as a DC-10 Captain for American Airlines. Despite his status as a professional airline pilot, Jet courageously defended wildlife at both the risk to his life and his job security — dropping parachutists into nuclear power plants, flying recon for Greenpeace seal and whale campaigns, and organizing the very first Greenpeace national office in San Francisco.

Jet was the first to support Captain Paul Watson when he left Greenpeace and founded the Sea Shepherd Conservation Society, both financially and actively. Captain Johnson joined Captain Watson in 1978 in an investigation of elephant poaching in East Africa, running dangerously close to an encounter with Ugandan president Idi Amin and ducking poacher’s bullets in Kenya.

Jet Johnson sailed on the first Sea Shepherd and was arrested on the Sea Shepherd II in 1983 for protecting baby harp seals. Over the years he has stood side by side with Captain Watson defending seals, whales, dolphins, and elephants.

Whenever Sea Shepherd has needed a pilot, Jet Johnson has been ready. In 1982, Captain Johnson flew Paul Watson and Carroll Vogel on a successful paint-bombing mission of a Soviet spy vessel off Washington State. The flight was a campaign against illegal Russian whaling activities.

Although retired from American Airlines, Jet still is active with Sea Shepherd and joined the crew to deliver the Ocean Warrior from Europe to North America.

Jet Johnson is without a doubt the world’s foremost conservationist pilot. In addition to his legendary exploits with Greenpeace and Sea Shepherd, Jet flew Chief Paiukan’s plane for the Kaiyapo nation in the rainforests of Brazil in 1990.

Jet Johnson is the father of three girls and the grandfather of one boy. He lives in British Columbia and is one of the most respected figures in the Canadian conservationist community.

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Dr. Louise Leakey

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Louise Leakey was brought up in Kenya and spent much of her youth in the remote deserts of northern Kenya at Lake Turkana accompanying her parents, Richard and Meave, on their paleontology field expeditions. Louise received her PhD from University College London, and is currently an Assistant Research Professor of Anthropology at the University of Stony Brook, and is a director of Public Education and Outreach of the Turkana Basin Institute. Louise is a National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence in recognition of the long-term support of the National Geographic Society for the Leakey family paleontological work in East Africa. Continuing this tradition, she co-leads the paleoanthropological expeditions in Kenya with her mother Meave, focusing their efforts on the fossil deposits going back four million years.

Lake Turkana has been the focus of paleoanthropological research over the past 50 years by the Leakey family and their colleagues. This research has made significant contributions to the understanding of human origins and behavior, and has been documented in hundreds of publications including nine covers in the prestigious scientific journal Nature.

Louise has recently been involved in an initiative with Autodesk, to bring the fossil collections housed in the National Museums of Kenya and at Lake Turkana online, to make them more accessible to the pubic and teachers worldwide. The website Africanfossils.org, is a virtual paleontology lab in which digitized models of various skulls are placed and can be explored by all. It will be possible to 3D print and download the templates for building models of these fossils in an effort to make them accessible and to engage the public. Louise also heads the Leakey family vineyards, and is a bush pilot, educator and lecturer. She is an alumni of the Young Global Leaders, she sits of the advisory board of the Fund for Wild Nature, and a long-time member of Sea Shepherd board of advisors, as well as on the board of the Centre for Communicating Science. She is married to Emmanuel de Merode, who is the Warden-in-Chief of Virunga National Park in the war torn Eastern Democratic Republic of Congo. They have two daughters Seiyia and Alexia, who live with Louise outside Nairobi and frequently join her on expeditions to northern Kenya.

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Dr. Godfrey Merlen

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English biologist Dr. Godfrey Merlen has lived in the Galapagos Islands for more than 40 years. He was originally drawn to the islands because unlike other places in the world, it was still possible to see and feel nature’s patterns of sustainability in these unique ecosystems. Godfrey works independently with the Ministry of Agriculture (Agrocalidad-Sicgal), the Ministry of the Environment (Galapagos National Park), the Charles Darwin Foundation (CDF), and several NGOs including Sea Shepherd Galapagos to fight illegal fishing, protect the marine reserve and control unsustainable development.

Merlen’s decades-long encounter with whales, especially the sperm whale, have convinced him of the infinite value of the oceans, without which we will, as has been said, “Die of a great loneliness of spirit.”

In 1991, Merlen was deeply involved in the creation of the Galapagos Whale Sanctuary. For ten years, he worked with the Galapagos National Park in defense of the Galapagos Marine Reserve. He now works on introduced species on the islands that present the greatest risk to Galapagos. Godfrey’s findings have been published widely on issues related to the islands including three books on Galapagos wildlife.

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Grant Pereira

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Grant has been involved in conservation work for more than 30 years, and lives by the philosophy of “getting his feet wet and hands dirty.” In Singapore, he has an ongoing program to replant mangroves at coastal shores to encourage the return of native fauna and flora.

Grant has been very active in the anti-sharkfin campaign, heading up a marketing and educational campaign to stop the brutal slaughter of sharks for their fins. He has created, marketed and widely distributed postcards and posters which illustrate the devastation of the shark-finning practice, the dolphin slaughter in Japan and captive dolphin shows in Asia.

In 2000, Grant was awarded the Greenleaf Award, which is the highest environmental award given to an individual in Singapore.

Presently, Grant is the head of the Green Volunteers Network of the Singapore Environment Council, which is the most active environmental organization in Singapore.

grant_talk

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